Love and Monsters

I saw Dr. Who this weekend, the one with Peter Kay as the absorbaloff – very good I thought. A welcome change to have an episode with the Dr. and Rose hardly in it. Marc Warren played a likeable geeky character who set up a club of Dr Who fans, which was turning nicely into just a mini-social club, until Peter Kay butts in and bullies them into finding the Dr.

I thought this episode was quite risky, the Absorbaloff was invented by a Blue Peter fan who won a competition. Plus the fact that Peter Kay played it. It could have easily bombed. But the saving grace for me was Marc Warren, he steals the show and makes the episode well worth it. Marc Warren normally plays junkies or psychos. There was a couple of familiar faces in his club as well. Notably ‘Moaning Myrtle’ (Shirley Henderson) from the Harry Potter films.

Someone here (at work)  said that he thought Dr. Who had ‘jumped the shark’. A phrase I was not familiar with, he explained that this is a term used for a TV  programme which has reached the moment when it has started to go downhill, usually meaning that it has reached a point of ridicule. It comes from an episode of ‘Happy Days’ which featured The Fonz jumping over a shark whilst water skiing. From that point on, the show never recovered.

I have not seen as many Dr Who episodes as I’d like (its on at an awkward time for me) but every episode I’ve seen has been consistently excellent entertainment. I hope to catch many more, I may even invest in the DVD
collections. I hope it runs and runs, its caught a certain ‘Je ne sais quoi’ and is very popular.

Posted on behalf of Brian Cousins by Peter Grehan



7 comments


    Mark

    June 22, 2006

    I’m not sure that Dr Who has jumped the shark. I think, in all probability, that it is being held to idealised standards derived from the over complimentary minds of those who watched it as kids.

    Is Dr Who is as scary as it was however many years ago. No, not to the same people; but sit a child of 8 in front of it and you bet they’ll be crawling behind the sofa.

    Dr Who is going from strength to strength. Russell T Davies is a talented man. One can only hope some middle-aged, gay man does the same with Star Trek in 15 years. Maybe it will even be me!

    Mark

    Mark

    June 22, 2006

    I’m not sure that Dr Who has jumped the shark. I think, in all probability, that it is being held to idealised standards derived from the over complimentary minds of those who watched it as kids.

    Is Dr Who is as scary as it was however many years ago. No, not to the same people; but sit a child of 8 in front of it and you bet they’ll be crawling behind the sofa.

    Dr Who is going from strength to strength. Russell T Davies is a talented man. One can only hope some middle-aged, gay man does the same with Star Trek in 15 years. Maybe it will even be me!

    Mark

    Peter Grehan

    June 22, 2006

    To me, this episode shows both the strength and weakness of Russell T. Davies writing in Doctor Who. He generates interesting, and believably, ordinary people. I could identify with Marc Warren??????s character, especially when he was losing himself in the music of ELO. RTD??????s real genius is making us care about people who are just like us. He reverses the telescope on the good and the great and says, ??????Hey! Ordinary people are just as important you know.??????
    What seems to detract from this is his overuse of humour, which comes across at times as a little too glib. Too much comedy in his stories and the humour losses its power to amuse and begins to irritate. However, I have to admit that he seems to understand the TV market, because he??????s targeted (and seems to have captured) a whole new sector of the viewing public.

    For those of us, that as kids, watched and loved the likes of William Hartnell and Patrick Troughton in the golden age of Doctor Who, there is always the VCR and DVD to resort to.

    Mark Banerji

    June 22, 2006

    I found this episode especially terrifying , with scenes of Jackie (Rose’s mum) in a short skirt and waving her knickers about. Not to mention references to the love life of a slab of concrete, did a Blue Peter winner realy dream that up or was it put in just for the grown ups? So many levels.

    Looks like we could be seeing the end of “Rose”:http://www.thestage.co.uk/tvtoday/2006/06/whys_she_leaving_because_she_wants_to.php which means no more Jackie unless of course she becomes the Doctor’s next companion..scarry.

    Peter Grehan

    June 22, 2006

    Yes, I found the images generated by Marc Warren’s character admiting that he still had a sex life with the face in a slab of concrete particularly disturbing. I suspect that’s exactly what RTD wanted.

    Bruno

    June 22, 2006

    milieu etrange http://www.milieu-etrange.0chattes.com [URL=http://www.milieu-etrange.0chattes.com]milieu etrange[/URL]

    Micheal

    June 22, 2006

    Who’s brother-in-law is Russel T Davies that he remains a writer
    on this show? and what 8 year old proposed the story?

    Complete rubbish. To sumarise: Benny-Hill level fart & knicker
    jokes, meets the East-Enders school of script-writing. I’ll not
    waste time bemoaning B-level over-acting, since many a Dr Who
    episode has this (and that’s what makes them fun). What this
    episode lacked was any sense of connection to Dr. Who. I sat in
    stunned and then embarassed silence through the whole hour,
    wondering when the show was going to start. It didn’t.

    The green-garbage-monster running down the street was only
    the second lowest point, after sexual-innuedo with a human
    paving stone.

    Yes, I used to watch Dr Who in the golden era of Tom Baker. I
    have enjoyed many of the new Doctor’s exploits. This was awful.

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