Radio CASE

Professor Mark Brake is on BBC Radio Wales tonight to talk about his work at the University.

Mark will be talking about his exploits in science communication and science fiction on the Adam Walton Show between 9 and 10pm.



18 comments


    petegrehan

    April 10, 2007

    You know, this picture is just begging to become the next caption competition!

    prof

    April 10, 2007

    Found it somewhere in the archives. Think it was a marketing gag, way back

    petegrehan

    April 10, 2007

    So Mr. Bond… Ooops!

    Smock

    April 10, 2007

    “I can see the pub from here” ?

    Mark

    April 10, 2007

    The world’s first do-it-at-home laser eye surgery kit was larger than John thought it would be.

    David

    April 10, 2007

    John realised that he should have ordered the stepladder with the telescope.

    Smock

    April 10, 2007

    Batteries for remote control not included

    David

    April 10, 2007

    Steve really wished that his mum hadn’t put his labcoat and his Cardiff City replica kit in the same wash.

    David

    April 10, 2007

    After a couple of days of playing with it, Bob was bored with his christmas present and wished he’d asked for a PlayStation instead.

    Smock

    April 10, 2007

    Bob usually brought home traffic cones.

    petegrehan

    April 10, 2007

    The pocket calculator was fine. It was the battery it came with that was such a pain.

    Dai Jones

    April 10, 2007

    so you remove my quesiton about the radio programme, and now
    my question as to why my question was removed! Censorship, not
    a proper blog….. Scared to discuss and answer questions are you?

    Dai

    April 10, 2007

    Right, good to see my comment this time has not been removed.
    So, it was mentioned on the radio programme that Professor Brake
    is something to do with a NASA committee. I cannot remember the
    details. What is this all NASA thing about?

    prof

    April 10, 2007

    Thanks for your question, Dai.

    In recognition of the growing academic research status of astrobiology, NASA established the NASA Astrobiology Institute (NAI) in 1998 as one element of its research program in astrobiology.

    The NAI is currently composed of 16 Lead Teams, representing over 700 investigators across the United States, and has international partnerships with astrobiology research organisations around the world, including the Australian Centre for Astrobiology (ACA) at Macquarie University.

    The NAI??????s Astrobiology Roadmap outlines a network of pathways for synergistic research development among participating NASA programs and academic researchers worldwide. Essential to the Roadmap are four guiding Implementation Principles that steer the astrobiology programme.

    Our degree programmes at CASE address each fundamental principle, and meet the challenge of educating future graduates in astrobiology.

    NASA??????s first guiding Principle is that of:

    Integrating Scientific Principles: Astrobiology is multidisciplinary in content and interdisciplinary in execution. Its success depends on close coordination of diverse scientific disciplines and programs, including space missions.

    NASA tackles the moral question of environmentalism in its second guiding Principle:

    Planetary Protection: Astrobiology encourages planetary stewardship through an emphasis on protection against forward and back biological contamination and recognition of ethical issues associated with exploration.

    The fundamentally important question of societal and cultural concerns is engaged in NASA??????s third and fourth guiding Principles:

    Astrobiology and Society: Astrobiology recognized a broad societal interest in its endeavours, especially in areas such as achieving a deeper understanding of life, searching for extraterrestrial biospheres, assessing the societal implications of discovering other examples of life, and envisioning the future of life on Earth and in space.

    Future Generations: The intrinsic public interest in astrobiology offers a crucial opportunity to educate and inspire the next generation of scientists, technologists and informed citizens: thus a strong emphasis upon education and public outreach is essential.

    Along with my colleague Carol Oliver from Macquarie University, New South Wales, I had the pleasure of sitting on the NAI focus group for the Science Communication of astrobiology. The focus group developed a Astrobiology Communication Roadmap designed specifically to support and complement the NAI Astrobiology Roadmap and its Implementation Principles by identifying specific pathways critical to effective and broad communications about astrobiology.

    The purpose of this complementary Roadmap is to ??????facilitate and realise effective, proactive communications about astrobiology across the spectrum of disciplines, audience types, and formats??????. The proposed implementation plan for astrobiology includes five goals for effective communications:

    1: Facilitate understanding, information exchange and expansion of expertise between and among astrobiology researchers and the disciplines they represent;

    2: Foster communication and information exchange between the astrobiology community and experts and professionals in other fields (philosophy, ethics, religion, history, law, psychology, social sciences, art, communications, etc.);

    3: Support educators and the mass media in communicating about astrobiology and issues of ??????astrobiology & society??????;

    4: Encourage Best Practices in the Science Communication of astrobiology;

    5: Facilitate timely and strategic communication of astrobiology and its issues among diverse audiences including citizens, policy makers, administrators, and sponsors.

    Dai

    April 10, 2007

    Very good…. That is really interesting. I sometimes wish I’d studied
    something closer to science than languages! How many times has
    this focus group met? Was it just the once to get things kick-
    started, or have you met regularly over the years?

    Astrobiology is a new subject for me to think about, never thought
    about it much before, not as a serious subject anyway, just aliens
    and things. I didn’t know NASA were so serious about it. Have you
    ever worked at NASA?

    prof

    April 10, 2007

    Not worked AT NASA, Dai, but work WITH NASA on a daily basis. We can stay home in Wales and let NASA come to us!

    Dai

    April 10, 2007

    I wonder if the ET’s on Mars are thinking the same thing – “let
    NASA come to us” 🙂

    Sue Burnett

    April 10, 2007

    “Holding hands isn’t all it’s cracked up to be,” thought Mark as he gazed into the eye of his new robotic girlfriend.

Leave a comment


Name

Email(will not be published)

Website

Your comment

Designed by Forte Web Solutions