Kill the Moon

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I had heard stories that Steven Moffet actually hated science fiction but I hadn’t really realised how much until seeing this very silly story of our moon turning out to be an egg. He seems to be collecting writers with the same leanings since Kill the Moon would be an excellent premise for a fantasy universe of magical creatures. In this fantasy universe magic could fill in all those logic gaps like, why does a creature born in the vacuum of space have wings? A fantasy universe where giant eggs could orbit a planet this would have been an excellent idea, but we live in our universe in which certain ‘universal’ physical laws are meant to govern and Doctor Who is meant to exist in this one (excluding the odd exclusion to alternative universes)

The moon is our closet neighbour in space and we do know so much about it and why it is important the life on Earth, but none of that seems relevant in a story where it is claimed that the moon has been increasing in mass (i.e. becoming heavier) because an embryo has been growing! Mass is mass, if an embryo grows it is taking it from inside the egg, it can’t magically increase matter! But wait this magic, which can explain everything. The crew of the ancient orbital space shuttle converted to travel to the moon are Captain Lundvik and two other ageing astronauts. Apparently humanity has lost interest in space, so no new ones have been trained. They may as well have said, humanity has lost interest in science and now waves crystals in air and hums monotone tunes in yurts wearing kaftans whilst smoking incense as an alternative to studying science.

And long gone are the days when Doctor Who was intended to teach and inform about science and history, because people would rather learn about kittens that live in the asteroid belt and giant spiders the weave webs amongst the moons Jupiter, which is in fact a enormous bee hive for enormous bees. And by the way bacteria is bacteria, whatever the size of the thing it lives on, there’s just more of it.

Written by Peter Grehan

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